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Jackson Lopez
Jackson Lopez

Buy Potassium Supplements


Potassium is needed to maintain good health. Although a balanced diet usually supplies all the potassium a person needs, potassium supplements may be needed by patients who do not have enough potassium in their regular diet or have lost too much potassium because of illness or treatment with certain medicines.




buy potassium supplements


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Injectable potassium is administered only by or under the supervision of your doctor. Some forms of oral potassium may be available in stores without a prescription. Since too much potassium may cause health problems, you should take potassium supplements only if directed by your doctor.


To start with, you're much better off getting potassium from foods instead of potassium supplements. Many fruits and vegetables are rich in potassium, including spinach, sweet potatoes, cantaloupe, bananas, and avocado. Potassium-rich diets help control blood pressure and have been linked to a lower risk of stroke. But such diets also tend to be lower in sodium and contain other healthful nutrients, which may contribute to the observed blood pressure benefit.


Keeping your blood potassium level in the correct range is important, because this mineral also plays a key role in the function of nerves and muscles, including heart muscle. Your kidneys help regulate potassium levels in your blood. But age, diabetes, heart failure, and certain other conditions may impair kidney function. As a result, potassium levels can rise to high levels, leading to dangerous heart rhythm problems and even cardiac arrest.


However, grocery stores carry salt substitutes that may contain much higher amounts of potassium. People trying to curb their sodium intake may try these products. A mere one-quarter teaspoon of one brand contains about 800 mg of potassium. If you take a potassium-sparing diuretic, such as spironolactone, you should avoid salt substitutes and limit high-potassium foods.


However, if you take a diuretic that depletes potassium levels, such as hydrochlorothiazide or furosemide, your doctor may prescribe extended-release potassium tablets, which contain 600 to 750 mg of the mineral. And if you take any diuretic or ACE inhibitor, ask your doctor whether you need periodic testing of your potassium and kidney function, to be on the safe side.


About half of all Americans routinely take dietary supplements. The most common ones are multivitamin and multimineral supplements. Making Sense of Vitamins and Minerals: Choosing the foods and nutrients you need to stay healthy explains the evidence behind the benefits and safety profiles of various vitamins and minerals. It also includes the recommended minimum and maximum amounts you should consume, as well as good food sources of each.


A person should prioritize getting potassium from their diet. Sources of potassium include dried apricots, lentils, squash, prunes, potato, kidney beans, and bananas. Apricots offer the most potassium.


Most people who eat a healthy diet should get enough potassium naturally. Low potassium is associated with a risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, cancer, digestive disorders, and infertility. For people with low potassium, doctors sometimes recommend improved diets -- or potassium supplements -- to prevent or treat some of these conditions.


The Institute of Medicine has set an adequate intake for potassium. Getting this amount of potassium from diet, with or without supplements, should be enough to keep you healthy. The FDA has determined that foods that contain at least 350 milligrams of potassium can bear the following label: "Diets containing foods that are good sources of potassium and low in sodium may reduce the risk of high blood pressure and stroke."


This fact sheet is about the NYS policy for people, especially those who live within ten miles of a nuclear power plant, who may be exposed to radiation from a nuclear plant emergency. In December 2001, the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said if there was a radiation emergency, people should take a drug that would help protect them from thyroid cancer. This drug is called potassium iodide (KI). The New York State Health Department agrees. The questions and answers below will give you more information.


The total amount of potassium in the adult body is about 45 millimole (mmol)/kg body weight (about 140 g for a 175 pound adult; 1 mmol = 1 milliequivalent [mEq] or 39.1 mg potassium) [3]. Most potassium resides intracellularly, and a small amount is in extracellular fluid [2-4]. The intracellular concentration of potassium is about 30 times higher than the extracellular concentration, and this difference forms a transmembrane electrochemical gradient that is maintained via the sodium-potassium (Na+/K+) ATPase transporter [4]. In addition to maintaining cellular tonicity, this gradient is required for proper nerve transmission, muscle contraction, and kidney function.


Normal serum concentrations of potassium range from about 3.6 to 5.0 mmol/L and are regulated by a variety of mechanisms [3,7]. Diarrhea, vomiting, kidney disease, use of certain medications, and other conditions that alter potassium excretion or cause transcellular potassium shifts can cause hypokalemia (serum levels below 3.6 mmol/L) or hyperkalemia (serum levels above 5.0 mmol/L) [3,5,7,8]. Otherwise, in healthy individuals with normal kidney function, abnormally low or high blood levels of potassium are rare.


Assessing potassium status is not routinely done in clinical practice, and it is difficult to do because most potassium in the body is inside cells. Although blood potassium levels can provide some indication of potassium status, they often correlate poorly with tissue potassium stores [3,9,10]. Other methods to measure potassium status include collecting balance data (measuring net potassium retention and loss); measuring the total amount of potassium or the total amount of exchangeable potassium in the body; and conducting tissue analyses (e.g., muscle biopsies), but all have limitations [9].


Intake recommendations for potassium and other nutrients are provided in the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) developed by expert committees of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) [11]. DRI is the general term for a set of reference values used for planning and assessing nutrient intakes of healthy people. These values, which vary by age and sex, include:


In 2019, a NASEM committee updated the DRIs for potassium (and sodium) [11]. The committee found the data insufficient to derive an EAR for potassium. Therefore, they established AIs for all ages based on the highest median potassium intakes in healthy children and adults, and on estimates of potassium intakes from breast milk and complementary foods in infats. Table 1 lists the current AIs for potassium for healthy individuals.


The NASEM committee also used an expanded DRI model to include a recommended intake level for a nutrient to reduce the risk of chronic disease, what they termed the chronic disease risk reduction intake (CDRR) [11,12]. According to the model, a CDRR might be set for a nutrient like potassium when there is a causal relationship between a certain level of intake and a reduced risk of chronic disease based on evidence of at least moderate strength. However, the committee found the evidence to be insufficient to derive a CDRR for potassium.


Food Potassium is found in a wide variety of plant and animal foods and in beverages. Many fruits and vegetables are excellent sources, as are some legumes (e.g., soybeans) and potatoes. Meats, poultry, fish, milk, yogurt, and nuts also contain potassium [3,5]. Among starchy foods, whole-wheat flour and brown rice are much higher in potassium than their refined counterparts, white wheat flour and white rice [13].


Milk, coffee, tea, other nonalcoholic beverages, and potatoes are the top sources of potassium in the diets of U.S. adults [14]. Among children in the United States, milk, fruit juice, potatoes, and fruit are the top sources [15].


Not all multivitamin/mineral supplements contain potassium, but those that do typically provide about 80 mg potassium [18]. Potassium-only supplements are also available, and most contain up to 99 mg potassium. Information on many dietary supplements that contain potassium is available in the Dietary Supplement Label Database from the National Institutes of Health, which contains label information from tens of thousands of dietary supplement products on the market.


Many dietary supplement manufacturers and distributors limit the amount of potassium in their products to 99 mg (which is only about 2% of the DV) because of two concerns related to potassium-containing drugs. First, the FDA has ruled that some oral drug products that contain potassium chloride and provide more than 99 mg potassium are not safe because they have been associated with small-bowel lesions [19]. Second, the FDA requires some potassium salts containing more than 99 mg potassium per tablet to be labeled with a warning about the reports of small-bowel lesions [20,21]. In accordance with a ruling by Congress, the FDA may not limit the amount of any nutrient, including potassium, in a dietary supplement, except for safety-related reasons [22]. However, the FDA has not issued a ruling about whether dietary supplements containing more than 99 mg potassium must carry a warning label [21,23].


Only a few studies have examined how well the various forms of potassium in dietary supplements are absorbed. A 2016 dose-response trial found that humans absorb about 94% of potassium gluconate in supplements, and this absorption rate is similar to that of potassium from potatoes [24]. According to an older study, liquid forms of potassium chloride (used as drugs to treat conditions such as digitalis intoxication or arrhythmias due to hypokalemia) are absorbed within a few hours [6]. Enteric coated tablet forms of potassium chloride (designed to prevent dissolution in the stomach but allow it in the small intestine) are not absorbed as rapidly as liquid forms [25]. 041b061a72


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